Phone counselling

PHONE
COUNSELLING


Although phone counselling is getting its momentum during COVID-19 crisis, our therapists have been working that way for years with employees using the Employment Assistance Programme. As counselling is often called talking therapy or even talking cure, the telephone seems to be the right medium for it.
The convenience of using the telephone over sessions using video is that there is more intimate focus on language that we use to frame our feelings and thoughts. Phone counselling gives the opportunity to focus on the verbal dimension in creating changes in our thinking patterns, relationships and ways we interact with the world. It is also a way of focusing on non-verbal cues looking at the interruptions, breathing, tone of voice, etc.


Phone counselling

For some people phone counselling is a necessity - they may feel unable to travel, attend crowded place or want to show themselves. For others, it may be a convenient way of starting the therapy during the coronavirus epidemic with possibilities of having a call from a car, walk or a confidential space that they will be able to carve-out from the home that they share. If you are in the latter category, your counsellor may ask you to start face to face meetings when safe to do so or at least have a face to face meeting every once in a while.

How does phone counselling work?

In many ways, phone counselling is similar to face to face or online therapy. Each session lasts 50 minutes, and in the initial appointment, your counsellor will agree with you your goals for the treatment. Talking through issues that brought you to the therapy, you will agree on the potential length of the therapy ranging from short term usually between 6 and 12 sessions to long term sometimes lasting even a few years. It is crucial that you select a therapist that you get on well; you like their tone of voice and find open to hearing their words. Even though in counselling, it is important to work through difficulties with your therapist if they appear, we should not start in this place. It is a common practice that clients check a few therapists before committing to working with one, especially if what they seek is long term treatment.

Therapists listed below are offering phone counselling, and you can contact them directly to arrange the first appointment. They will inform you about their fees and, during the initial meeting, decide if they have clinical competences to work with you. Similarly to face to face treatments, your counsellor will charge you for missed sessions and finish on time even if you are late.

In a small number of cases, they may also suggest alternative treatment to phone counselling if, in their assessment, you would benefit more from face to face or online counselling. Phone counselling sessions take place usually once a week at a regular time. The time of your appointment may change if you decide to see your clients at Kensington Counselling Rooms after the COVID-19 lockdown.

How to prepare for phone counselling?

When talking to the therapist from the convenience of your own home, please do not forget that counselling requires privacy. Even though you like to share everything with your partner or housemate, you will need to have private and uninterrupted time for the duration of each session. If you are using your smartphone, please consider updating your software and using an antivirus to make sure that your phone is ready and safe.

Regarding the content of the treatment you may wish to think through issues that bring you to therapy before your appointment, but for some of us, the initial session or even first few sessions will offer the opportunity to reflect on life and therapy goals. For some people, counselling may be challenging, and their mental health may worsen a little at the beginning as we come with the clearer realisation of our life situation. If this is something you are worried about, please tell this to your therapist as you start.

List of therapists working over the phone

Below is the list of therapists that have experience in phone counselling. Please inquire with them for their availability and fees that may vary.

Click here to view Emma Myrtle's profile

Emma Myrtle

BACP Registered Counsellor & Psychotherapist

Working on Tuesdays, Wednesdays
Phone: 07562228022
Email: emma@emmamyrtletherapy.com

Click here to view Ondine Smulders' profile

Ondine Smulders

UKCP Accredited Psychotherapist

Working on Mondays, Wednesdays
Phone: 07456 918147
Email: counselling17@hotmail.com

Click here to view Simon Wilson Stephen's profile

Simon Wilson Stephens

BACP Registered Counsellor

Working on Tuesdays, Thursdays
Phone: 07977 241 365
Email: simon@wilsonstephenstherapy.com

Camille de Stempel

BACP Registered Counsellor & Psychotherapist

Working on Tuesdays
Phone: 07801206199
Email: cdestempel@aol.com

Sian Morris, UKCP Accredited Psychotherapist

Dr Sian Morris

HCPC Counselling Psychologist

Working on Wednesdays
Phone: 07905819925
Email: sianlouisemorris@hotmail.co.uk

Robin Robinson

BACP Registered Counsellor

Working on Wednesdays
Phone: 07983 248 558
Email: robin@robinrobinson.co.uk

Online couples therapy

Online Couples
Therapy


Until a few months ago, we never dreamt that the world would come to a standstill. That all our dreams and inspirations will be on hold for a while. We did not imagine that the things we have worked hard and the family we have loved and protected will one day exposed to a deadly threat of coronavirus. Whether lockdown with our partner or in separation, this crisis will have an impact on how couples function together.


Online couples therapy

Realizing how things are getting out of control and the world standing still, have triggered many worries and anxieties about what the future holds for us.

Online couples therapy could help couples experiencing difficulties work on their marriage or relationships.   To have a better understanding of what the problem is, how it started, developed,  maintained, and what needs to change to improve things around.

By now, you might have to spend a lot of hours talking to people you know about your problems or struggles that you might be going through, and you feel maybe it is the right time to speak to a professional outside your circle of friends and family members.  Talking to friends and families can be helpful, but sometimes some things feel private, difficult to say or to hear. For many people, this can be a barrier to openly and honestly discussing their issues. Online couples counselling will provide a safe and non-judgment space to discuss what is disturbing you within your relationship.

The coronavirus has stolen a lot from us, but it doesn’t have to affect our relationships. Things will go back to normal. And when they do may we be found standing next to the person that matters the most.

For some couples, the coronavirus situation has accelerated processes that were dormant or avoided. This may be a time to talk more openly about the possibility of separation, and online couples counselling could be a good place to receive guidance and support in this difficult time. Although the majority of couples come for online therapy to repair their relationship, some use it to separate with honesty, mutual support and understanding of each other.

What is online couples therapy?

Online couples counselling is a supportive and convenient way to access a qualified couples’ counsellor or therapy when you need it, wherever you are. Your therapist will help you discuss issues in your marriage or relationship and improve the quality of your relationships. It is just like having face-to-face counselling, except you talk to a trained counsellor online using a secure video link.  ( i.e.  Zoom or Vsee).

What can couples expect?

You can have couples counselling with your partner when in the same location or on your own. If you and your partner live in different places, your couples counsellor will arrange a three-way Zoom call. You will receive a link to the meeting, and if you have never used Zoom before, please check our guide here.

How long is online couples therapy?

This question depends on each couple and the individual style of your counsellor. Short term limited couples therapy can keep the clarity of the couples’ goal and momentum while long term approach may allow the couples to come in and out of the treatment when a need occurs.

Online therapy is growing rapidly. The internet is not just for chatting with friends and relatives anymore, which recently we have all use the internet to catch up with friends and families during the lockdown period to save NHS and Save Lives.  But the internet has also made it possible for couples to work on their relationships and marriage during this lockdown period.

Soon, things will go back to ‘normal”.  Life will continue, and people will go with their everyday lives, and more demands will be placed upon our time. If this will be possible for you and your partner, your counsellor may suggest that you move your sessions to a physical location, but you will also have an option to carry on online if this is what you wish.

Couple therapists working online

To arrange your initial appointment, contact your counsellor directly.

Click here to view Ashleen Neeson's profile

Ashleen Neeson

BACP Registered Counsellor & Psychotherapist

Working on Tuesdays, Wednesdays
Phone: 07901981050
Email: Ashleen@clearmindlondon.co.uk

Robin Robinson

BACP Registered Counsellor

Working on Wednesdays
Phone: 07983 248 558
Email: robin@robinrobinson.co.uk

Transcendental Meditation

TRANSCENDENTAL
MEDITATION


Transcendental Meditation (TM) is an effortless and natural technique which can be learned by people of all ages regardless of background or beliefs. It is practiced very successfully by the busiest people with the busiest minds! Sitting comfortably on a chair with eyes closed, thinking a mantra silently for 20 minutes twice a day, TM can be practiced anywhere regardless of noise. Ongoing research has shown the powerful effects of regular TM practice in alleviating a range of mental health concerns such as anxiety, depression and PTSD. Because learning Transcendental Meditation does not require discussion or analysis of problems, (it works at a much subtler level), it is very compatible with, and enhances, other treatments including psychological therapy and mindfulness (as indicated both by research and anecdotal evidence).


A man seating in a chair with closed eyes - an example of Transcendental Meditation class

Free Online Transcendental Meditation Introductory talks

We look forward to being able to re-commence our courses teaching the powerful healing technique of Transcendental Meditation as soon as lockdown restrictions lift (TM cannot be taught to maximum effect online). For those who are keen to learn as soon as possible, we recommend that you book a course now  https://www.meditationtrust.com/latest-course-dates-venues/  (if a course isn't able to go ahead due to COVID your payment will be transferred to a later course at your convenience). Otherwise, in the meantime we are offering free online introductions to TM:

Join Dr Gemma Beckley (Clinical Psychologist & TM teacher) and Colin Beckley (Meditation Trust Founder, 30 yrs TM teacher) at our online zoom introductory talks where you will learn:

- What stress really is
- What Transcendental Meditation (TM) is & how it works
- how it differs from other types of meditation,
- the benefits of regular practice,
- how you can start enjoying the benefits for yourself!

Latest free talk dates can be found here:

https://www.meditationtrust.com/free-introductory-meditation-talks-meetups/

Click on the link below to register your place — we'll send you all of the details you need to join: https://www.meditationtrust.com/contact-the-meditation-trust/

It is recommended that you download and read our free ebook: https://www.meditationtrust.com/transcendental-meditation-explained-free-ebook/ - or contact us requesting us to send you our free information pack (by email or post) before joining. This way you can come with a basic understanding and have any outstanding questions answered.

__________

There are of course lots of different meditation techniques, most of which aim to control or train the mind by a way of thinking. Mindfulness, for example, works by changing our relationship with our thoughts. TM, however, is the most effective technique for allowing the mind to transcend (go beyond) surface level thinking towards silence (the source of thought). Most people who have tried other techniques are relieved to find that Transcendence involves no concentration, control, or training – a complete understanding of the nature of the mind reveals that it is counter-productive to try to force the mind to go somewhere it already wants to go naturally!.

Always wandering in search of happiness, the mind naturally settles towards a silence so deep that the body also gains a unique state of very deep rest, (much deeper even than sleep as indicated by scientific research). This is the exact physiological opposite to the stress (fight/flight) response, and therefore even the deepest stresses created during life’s most challenging experiences, and ultimately the cause of all physical and mental health problems, are spontaneously released.

The theories of modern psychology are increasingly aligning with this revival of the ancient Vedic wisdom brought to the West by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi from 1958 – that undue pressure of experience, whether mental or physical, may result in structural and biochemical abnormalities (‘stress’) in the body (known in Yoga literature for thousands of years as samskara or impressions [“scars”] in the nervous system). It is these ‘cellular memories’ rather than mental memories that cause the continuing experience of both physical and mental illness.

Mainstream psychology in recent years has recognised the effects of Trauma, often resulting in a PTSD diagnosis, as being held in the body. But the latest research is increasingly identifying links between a range of mental health issues (such as anxiety, depression and eating disorders) and imbalances in the physical body. This reflects the ancient Vedic understanding that psychological symptoms are a reflection of the physiological abnormalities (stress) distorting mental experience. The physical release during the practice of Transcendental Meditation relieves the psychological symptoms without any attention being given to the symptoms themselves. It is this ‘unstressing’ that is said to be responsible for the spontaneous restoration of normal function of various systems in the body during meditation, particularly those involved in adapting to environmental challenges

More than 700 scientific research studies have indicated a wide range of resulting improvements in all areas of life, including reductions in symptoms of anxiety, depression, PTSD and addiction. Also, improvements in sleep, self-confidence, relationships, well-being, energy levels and clarity of thought as well as a whole spectrum of physical health problems.

The Transcendental Meditation course begins with a one hour individual instruction followed by three two and a half hour group sessions (over three consecutive days) and includes free support and guidance for life.

The Kensington TM course is taught by Dr Gemma Beckley, a qualified HCPC registered Clinical Psychologist with many years of experience working in the NHS (including teaching mindfulness) and a qualified independent teacher of transcendental meditation (‘TM’). Gemma is now a full-time TM teacher for the registered UK charity the Meditation Trust, who offer courses for up to 50% off standard UK course fees. When you learn with the Meditation Trust you are also supporting their Charitable Projects, making TM accessible and affordable for all, including their Trauma Recovery© and Time Out© Programmes.

During Gemma’s career, she has conducted research exploring the effects of TM on occupational stress, and also on anxiety, depression and well-being. Her training to teach the technique of transcendental meditation began with instruction at the age of 6, followed by many years of intensive practice and advanced courses, culminating in several months of specific residential training in the methods laid down by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi.

She has since taught TM privately to the general public who are often experiencing high levels of stress with a range of physical and mental health problems including anxiety, depression and insomnia, plus people on the Autistic Spectrum and with diagnoses of ADHD, personality disorder, PTSD and schizophrenia. She is also the Director of the Trust’s Charitable Projects, which has involved teaching children in care and in schools both in the UK and developing countries.

Free ebook: https://www.meditationtrust.com/transcendental-meditation-explained-free-ebook

Contact details

Phone number: 01843 841010
Email: info@meditationtrust.com
Website:  http://www.meditationtrust.com

Online booking: https://www.meditationtrust.com/latest-course-dates-venues

Group Therapy

Group Analytic
Psychotherapy


Group Analysis is a therapeutic approach that is rooted in psychoanalysis but draws upon systemic, gestalt and sociological perspectives. Originating in the therapeutic work of S H Foulkes in the 1940s, it emphasises the social nature of human experience and aims at a healthier integration of the individual within his or her network of relationships.
A basic premise is that many of the difficulties with which individuals find themselves struggling have their roots in relational disturbances occurring in our group of origin – the family – and indeed in wider social and cultural interactions.


Introduction

A basic premise is that many of the difficulties with which individuals find themselves struggling have their roots in relational disturbances occurring in our group of origin – the family – and indeed in wider social and cultural interactions. The therapy group thus becomes a medium in which group members have an opportunity both to experience and to think about the way they feel and behave in relationship to others. With the interest and support of the group, members become, over time, better able to identify both their strengths and their difficulties and, where appropriate, better enabled to try more creative and productive ways of managing and of relating.

As with individual psychoanalytically-oriented counselling/psychotherapy, free flowing discussion is encouraged within an unstructured but confidential and boundaried environment. There is no formal agenda. Instead, themes emerge as communication in the group develops. Sometimes these themes are evident in the material an individual or cluster of individuals present, and sometimes they emerge in the relational dynamics that become alive in the group itself. Sometimes the group (including the therapist) may give a lot of attention to a particular individual, while sometimes the group-as-a-whole is given more focus. The constant shift from individual to group to individual is one of the dynamics that characterises a group analytic approach.

The facilitator

Bankole Jaiyeoba

BACP Registered Counsellor & Psychotherapist

Click Here to view Bankole Jaiyeoba's profile

Dr. Cindy M. George

BACP Registered Counsellor

Jodie Mainstone

BACP Accredited Counsellor & Psychotherapist

Please use this form to sign up or ask questions about the group







    Your Name (required)

    Your Email (required)

    Your phone number

    What interests you in group therapy?

    Additional information about the type of group therapy offered

    The role of the therapist/conductor

    The group analytic therapist tends to be referred to as ‘the conductor’ rather than, say, ‘leader’. This reflects a strong democratic principle at the heart of group analytic therapy and an understanding that the therapist’s role is not to initiate discussion or to overly direct the group but to respond to it in ways that help the group make sense of the stories that are told – of the motifs that resonate and the harmonies and dissonances amongst the voices that emerge.

    Just like an individual therapist, the conductor may, at times, make interpretations (suggestions about what is going on or what is ‘really being talked about’ or ‘not being talked about’). Conductors tend to do this less, however, than therapists working in the context of one-to-one therapy. This is because their role is to enable the group to do ‘the work’, rather than creating a dependence in which the group relies on the ‘leader’ to do it. In short, the conductor seeks to encourage the development of a group culture which facilitates:
    • free discussion
    • the sharing of experience
    • reflection upon that experience
    Together, these strands of individual and group work prompt changes at the level of feeling, thought and behaviour that can be profoundly helpful and liberating.

    The role of the other (client) members

    The role of the other members of a group analytic psychotherapy group is slightly different to that of a client in individual therapy – or rather, slightly more complex. This is because members of the therapy group are there not only to get help but to give it too. Giving help, however, doesn’t mean ‘playing therapist’ and not giving of yourself. Indeed, what soon becomes clear in a therapy group is that what is most helpful for the work of the group is for individuals to be most themselves – to be open, honest and to contribute as personally and as fully as possible. It is through the sharing of experience (of how we think and feel) in relation to our past and our present (including the relationships that develop from moment to moment in the group) and through creative reflection on that experience that individuals and the group-as-a-whole grow.

    Undertaking therapy of any kind is rarely easy. Amidst the times when members can feel hugely supported by the group and grateful for the insights and developments gained, there will, almost inevitably, be tough times too; times when the experiences emerging feel particularly difficult or painful or when it simply seems that little is happening. When things get difficult, often the difficulties may have a familiar feel. This is not surprising because although a therapy group is intended to be supportive, it is also a microcosm of the wider social groups to which everyone ‘belongs’ so sooner of later, some of the difficulties a person experiences outside the group are also likely to be experienced to some degree inside the group. The important difference, however, is that while in the ‘outside’ world, on the whole people don’t get a chance to untangle the experience, think it through and learn from it, but instead just struggle to manage and survive, in the therapy group, the processes of untangling, thinking through and learning from experience is what a lot of the therapeutic work is about.

    In order to establish both the group’s capacity to support each member and to work through any difficult experiences that arise, each member’s commitment to the group is of paramount importance; a commitment that is demonstrated by each person’s efforts to be open and honest and to share but also, at its most basic level, to be regular and punctual in attendance. Regular and punctual attendance become, if you like, the bedrock of a secure group. In a culture of such commitment, and in the consistency, reliability and safety it promotes, members are better able to trust the group as a place to which difficult feelings can be brought, expressed, explored and worked through. This enables, over time, each individual to develop and gain greater access to their own psychological resources and the psychological resources of others.

    Confidentiality is another important aspect of securing a safe boundary to the group and every member of the group is asked to respect the privacy of every other member and to treat what any individual might say in the group as confidential to the group. Further, group analytic therapy groups are known to work best when they are ‘stranger groups’; that is, when members do not know each other socially or associate with each other outside the group, either face-to-face or by phone or via email and the internet. Sometimes, of course, people do bump into each other outside the group. The important thing is that this is kept to a minimum and that, should it happen, members bring such meetings and interactions to the notice of the group.

    Group analytic groups can be anxiety provoking at times, particularly at the start, when everyone is new. These anxieties are often worth exploring in the group as they can offer important opportunities for learning for all. Over time, however, most people find that the lack of restrictions characteristic of a group analytic psychotherapy group provide a freedom that fosters psychological exploration in rich and rewarding ways.

    Notice of Absence

    If for any reason you are unable to make a meeting, it is important to let the group know as far in advance of your absence as possible. If, for any reason, you are unable to give the group advance notice, please let me know as soon as you can so that I can inform the group.

    Missed Sessions

    The cost of a missed session is the same as an attended session.

    Contract, Frequency, Duration & Size of Group

    The difficulties that we, as human beings, experience, often have their source in ways of thinking, relating and behaving that we have built up/learnt over a life-time. Inevitably, then, it can take quite a while to disentangle/unlearn them and to find alternative, more creative and productive ways of going forward. For this reason alone, members are strongly encouraged to think in terms of committing to attending the group for a substantial period and, in the event of leaving the group, are asked to give the group a minimum of 6 sessions notice, but longer if at all possible.

    Group Analytic groups meet either once or twice weekly, usually with three breaks during the year (at Easter, over August and at Christmas/New Year). Meetings last for one and a half hours. This Young Persons’ Therapy Group meets once weekly though, at a later date, there may be an opportunity to meet more frequently if that’s what the group wishes.

    Group size varies but will not exceed 8 members, excluding the conductor. The group is referred to as a ‘slow open group’. ‘Open’ refers to the fact that the group may change its membership gradually over time with some people leaving and others joining. ‘Slow’ refers to the fact that any such changes should happen slowly, over a period of time. The leaving of established members and the coming of new ones provide opportunities for important ‘learning-from-experience’ for everyone in the group. Over time, the group builds up a complex family history, all of which can contribute to a rich and varied learning experience.

    Use of confidential group material by the therapist

    All therapists are either required or strongly advised to have regular access to supervision. This is where the therapist works with another professional to think together about the individual and/or group they are working with. In addition to supervision of my own work with you, I am also involved in training other therapists and in research. In these contexts, it can be very helpful for the development of the therapy profession for me to be able to draw upon material from confidential settings such as the group and so I shall be seeking your permission at the outset. However, should you give your permission and should I use any of the material that emerges in the group, I would take every care to respect and protect your privacy and any material used would be appropriately disguised to ensure anonymity.

    Although I will be seeking permission from you, prior to you joining the group, to use such material in these very particular contexts and in this very particular (disguised and anonymous) way, you may also raise this issue for further discussion at any time during the course of the group should you wish to do so.

    Clinical supervision

    Clinical
    Supervision


    Many of the practitioners in the Kensington Counselling Rooms are experienced practitioners who also work as trainers and supervisors in the field of therapy, and they offer clinical supervision, in addition to their counselling and psychotherapy services.
    The therapists who are also supervisors have a variety of training backgrounds and areas of special expertise, but they each offer supervision with an integrative approach, which is respectful of and includes awareness of a broad range of therapy modalities, including psychodynamic, humanistic, relational and solution-focused approaches.


    Supervision usually happens once a month, or once a fortnight, depending on the workload and need of the professional who is coming for supervisory support. It is an important part of ethical, resourced practice by those in the helping professions, and an invaluable source of personal support and professional development in this line of work.

    It is so important for practitioners to model for our clients the possibility of caring well for ourselves and giving ourselves proper time and space, so we can pause, reflect, and feel nourished and supported, as we work and support others. Having regular supervision in a calm, beautiful, welcoming setting can be an important part of ensuring we are resourced as therapists. It shows we are walking our talk, so that our clients can see that we are valuing ourselves, just as we encourage them to!

    If you are someone working in the psychological, therapeutic or other helping professions, such as social work, you may feel that you would benefit from regular clinical supervision with an experienced therapist. This would involve looking over your work on a regular basis with them, in ways that are designed to be both supportive and sometimes gently challenging. This can bring more awareness for the practitioner coming for supervision, in terms of the bigger picture in which the work takes place, and the underlying unconscious processes and the organisational dynamics, they are involved with, which all play a part in how effective their work in the helping professions can be.

    If you are interested in having some supervision sessions with any of our practitioners, either in person, or online via Zoom, check out their individual profiles and get in touch with them directly.

    Clinical supervisors working from Kensington Counselling Rooms

    Click here to view Ashleen Neeson's profile

    Ashleen Neeson

    BACP Registered Counsellor & Psychotherapist

    Working on Tuesdays, Wednesdays
    Phone: 07901981050
    Email: Ashleen@clearmindlondon.co.uk

    Monica Mason Therapist

    Monica Mason

    BACP Accredited Counsellor & Psychotherapist

    Working on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays
    Phone: 0777 989 3399
    Email: monica@monicamason.com

    Click here to see Adam Kincel's profile

    Dr Adam Kincel

    UKCP Accredited Psychotherapist

    Working on Wednesdays
    Phone: 07920255542
    Email: adam@gestalt.uk.com

    Online therapy through Zoom

    Online Therapy
    Through Zoom


    Due to the spread of COVID-19, the majority of our clients and therapists moved to offer online therapy over a platform called Zoom. Although the practice will remain open for those clients for whom working face to face is essential, you may find it easier and safer to work with a therapist online.

    Our counsellors and psychotherapists have worked online before the coronavirus emergency. They are able to provide equally effective treatments online and offline for individuals, relationships and even groups.


    A person on a sofa with a laptop - online therapy through Zoom at Kensington Counselling Rooms

    At Kensington Counselling Rooms, we have chosen the online service of Zoom, for the additional encrypted security it offers, which makes it more confidential than services like Skype and FaceTime.

    Just as in face-to-face psychotherapy and counselling, with online Zoom sessions, we recommend that you take some things into consideration. We ask everyone who is interested in this service to make an initial appointment with the practitioner of your choice. During the initial appointment with your counsellor, you will decide whether this way of working is the most beneficial for you. Although some of you may choose to carry on the therapy online after the coronavirus epidemic, you will also have an option to have your therapy face to face at 125 Gloucester Road.

    As with face-to-face work, privacy is extremely important. Our practitioners work in a safe, private environment with no interruptions, and if Zoom sessions are to be effective, it will be necessary for you to also find a quiet and private space, with no interruptions for each online appointment, so that privacy and confidentiality can be maintained in the work.

    Although online Zoom sessions offer more flexibility around time and schedules, you would be expected to have the same commitment to your online therapy or supervision as you would be asked to have for any face-to-face appointments. Punctuality and commitment are just as important, when the work is happening via Zoom.

    Technical advice (if needed)

    When you sign up for your initial appointment with a practitioner of your choice (see below):
    1. Your counsellor will send you a link to the appointment.
    2. Please click on the link before the appointment to make sure you can access the waiting area.
    3. The program will most likely ask you to install a small Zoom interface.
    4. You can configure audio and video during the call (see video on the right).
    5. At the time of your online zoom counselling session your therapist will admit you to the call.

    Is zoom safe for counselling and psychotherapy?

    In the US, health authorities specified criteria for safe online working for clinicians. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, also known as HIPAA compliance, is awarded to services that provide sufficient encryption and privacy for remote therapeutic and medical work. Facetime, Skype, Facebook or Google are not HIPAA compliant as they collect personal information or listen to the conversations. In our conversation with Skype, we were told that they listen to some of the calls to ensure the best quality of their service. As much as this is great for their product, this is not suitable for the privacy that counselling and psychotherapy require.
    Zoom is HIPAA compliant and has a strong privacy policy. Even though in March 2020, some journalist identified flaws in the system that made it more vulnerable to hacking or spamming, the company have resolved the issues and continuously works on making Zoom safe. With the most AES 256-bit GCM encryption, Zoom is as safe as a bank website and we recommed it to our therapists and clients.

    Counsellors and Psychotherapists offering Online Therapy via Zoom

    If you think that online Zoom sessions could be a good option for you, check our directory of practitioners, choose one, and then get in touch with them to arrange an appointment.

    Click here to view Ashleen Neeson's profile

    Ashleen Neeson

    BACP Registered Counsellor & Psychotherapist

    Working on Tuesdays, Wednesdays
    Phone: 07901981050
    Email: Ashleen@clearmindlondon.co.uk

    Emily Cavendish

    UKCP Accredited Psychotherapist

    Working on Mondays, Tuesdays, Fridays
    Phone: 07766140325
    Email: info@emilycavendish.com

    Click here to view Emma Myrtle's profile

    Emma Myrtle

    BACP Registered Counsellor & Psychotherapist

    Working on Tuesdays, Wednesdays
    Phone: 07562228022
    Email: emma@emmamyrtletherapy.com

    Karmela Jones

    BACP Registered Counsellor & Psychotherapist

    Working on Mondays, Wednesdays
    Phone: 07494743897
    Email: karmela@mixedemotionscounselling.com

    Click here to view Melanie Plant's profile

    Melanie Plant

    BACP Registered Counsellor & Psychotherapist

    Working on Wednesdays, Thursdays
    Phone: 07971647393
    Email: melanie@melanieplant.com

    Monica Mason Therapist

    Monica Mason

    BACP Accredited Counsellor & Psychotherapist

    Working on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays
    Phone: 0777 989 3399
    Email: monica@monicamason.com

    Click here to view Ondine Smulders' profile

    Ondine Smulders

    UKCP Accredited Psychotherapist

    Working on Mondays, Wednesdays
    Phone: 07456 918147
    Email: counselling17@hotmail.com

    Click here to view Simon Wilson Stephen's profile

    Simon Wilson Stephens

    BACP Registered Counsellor

    Working on Tuesdays, Thursdays
    Phone: 07977 241 365
    Email: simon@wilsonstephenstherapy.com

    Camille de Stempel

    BACP Registered Counsellor & Psychotherapist

    Working on Tuesdays
    Phone: 07801206199
    Email: cdestempel@aol.com

    Sian Morris, UKCP Accredited Psychotherapist

    Dr Sian Morris

    HCPC Counselling Psychologist

    Working on Wednesdays
    Phone: 07905819925
    Email: sianlouisemorris@hotmail.co.uk

    Jodie Mainstone

    BACP Accredited Counsellor & Psychotherapist

    Working on Thursdays
    Phone: 07903619191
    Email: Jodie@mainstonecounselling.com

    Robin Robinson

    BACP Registered Counsellor

    Working on Wednesdays
    Phone: 07983 248 558
    Email: robin@robinrobinson.co.uk

    Sarah Williams

    ADMP Dance Movement Psychotherapist

    Working on Mondays
    Phone: 07776331663
    Email: sarahwilliamsdmp@gmail.com

    Relationship therapy

    Relationship
    Therapy


    Modern relationships can be complicated – there are so many ways now to have intimate and/or sexual connections with others. At some point, most of us need some support to work out what we really want from our intimate relationships, and how to have the most mutually authentic and rewarding connections with others that we can.
    Relationship counselling and psychotherapy is one of the most effective ways to do this.


    Relationship work is not just for straight couples, but can be a help to anyone who has an intimate committed relationship to another, and who finds they are having problems sustaining that.

    People often turn to counselling or psychotherapy for their relationship when what used to feel romantic, supportive, exciting, sexually playful and fulfilling seems to have lost much of these qualities. Instead, being with the other evokes a painful amount of irritation, boredom, conflict, sexual frustration and a sense of either being trapped or let down by the other. If these painful feelings take up too much of the time and space in a relationship, people can begin to fear they can't or shouldn't sustain their connection with the other and it will have to end.
    Insecurities, personal histories, fears and the breakdown of trust can make it difficult to fully enjoy each other’s company. These emotions are common in relationships, and most people experience them sometimes. But when they start dominating the relationship and partners don’t seem to be able to move on, then therapy and counselling can help.
    In relationship therapy you can look closely into what you appreciate about and would like to keep in your relationship, and what you’d like to see changed. You and your partner can come to a better understanding of how conflicts are usually created and how each of you deals with them; also, what issues you each find difficult to talk about, and when you feel both misunderstood or not listened to.

    For some, the therapy is seen as a ‘last resort’ to salvage the relationship. Others use sessions as a way to keep their relationship healthy and address any underlying concerns that may become conflicts in the future. For a few people, the therapy is the best way to finally come to a good enough resolution that the relationship ought to end and to manage this with less bitterness and hurt.

    You can’t repair a relationship in one or two sessions, but in time, therapy can offer you a way to help people understand why they chose to connect to each other, and how a rich, enduring link with someone else can be built and sustained.

    To find out more about relationship therapy, you can contact any of the therapists listed below:

    Click here to view Ashleen Neeson's profile

    Ashleen Neeson

    BACP Registered Counsellor & Psychotherapist

    Working on Tuesdays, Wednesdays
    Phone: 07901981050
    Email: Ashleen@clearmindlondon.co.uk

    Dr. Cindy M. George

    BACP Registered Counsellor

    Working on Fridays
    Phone: 07385616440
    Email: drcindygeorge@gmail.com

    Robin Robinson

    BACP Registered Counsellor

    Working on Wednesdays
    Phone: 07983 248 558
    Email: robin@robinrobinson.co.uk

    Psychotherapy and counselling West London

    INDIVIDUAL
    THERAPY


    Just to let you know, our practice has been assessed for the risk related to passing COVID-19 and our procedures allow us to keep 2 meters away from anyone else within the practice while frequently disinfecting common areas. For more information about our COVID standards please read our article Are counselling and psychotherapy practices safe for face to face work after the pandemic?

    Now about therapy, as this is what you are here for. Finding the right therapist can be a daunting challenge but now you have found us, we would like to welcome you in and give you a friendly tour of our practice and the people who work here.
    Below, you can find a brief description of what’s involved in therapy, how therapy/counselling can help you – in the good times as well as the bad – how to choose the right therapist for you and how the sessions at Kensington work.
    Do take a look around our practice and if you have any questions or would like any more info do get in contact with our practitioners. We would be more than happy to help you on your journey to a better, more fulfilled life.


    What’s involved

    Both psychotherapy and counselling aim to improve the quality of your life. They involve regular meetings with a trained professional who helps you to build a healthier, more productive and joyful life. Psychotherapy and counselling require commitment and courage, they will not provide a quick fix but they can lead you to a place where you feel more satisfied and your life is in your hands.

    When can you benefit from psychotherapy and counselling?

    • When you are struggling. You may be feeling “stuck,” stressed, helpless, inadequate or disoriented because of your current life situation, or because a traumatic experience from your past, which you may only be vaguely aware of, is holding you back.
    • When you want to improve your wellbeing, psychotherapy and counselling are excellent ways to explore your potential and to make an already decent life even better.

    For the hard times. When you are going through a hard time, the therapist/counsellor will support you in a warm, non-judgmental way with respect, empathy and acceptance. They will also help you resolve or mitigate destructive patterns in your thinking, attitudes, emotional reactions, physical experiences or the way you relate to others. Therapy will help you develop new healthier ways to get on with your life.

    For the good times. However, therapy is not only for the hard times when life seems to be falling apart, it can be an enriching experience in itself. It can, for instance, help you with:

    • expanding your awareness, enabling you to accept yourself and become a true friend to yourself;
    • working towards healthier self-esteem and better self-care;
    • improving already functional relationships with your loved ones;
    • promoting healthy changes in your career by exploring what you need to progress, helping you overcome fears and interpersonal problems;
    • generally becoming more aware of your purpose, beliefs and emotional reality, which will often return excitement and inspiration to your life.

    Psychotherapy or counselling?

    All of our practitioners in West London offer individual counselling or psychotherapy.

    The terms psychotherapy and counselling are often used interchangeably but there are some differences.

    Counselling tends to be shorter-term and focuses on supporting you through a current difficult experience such as bereavement, illness, divorce, and milder mental health dysfunctions.

    Psychotherapy typically involves a more in-depth process of self-exploration, for example, looking at how ways of thinking, feeling and behaving that formed in early life are affecting you now and what new attitudes and skills you can develop to live a happier and healthier life. A great benefit of psychotherapy is its long-lasting effect. Apart from helping you to cope better now, you can learn and practice new skills that will become a part of you and expand your potential.

    People come for counselling and psychotherapy for many reasons. Some of the most common reason include:

    • anxiety
    • depression
    • loss and bereavement
    • alcohol, drug, food, exercise and pornography addictions
    • relationship and sexual difficulties
    • problems with anger
    • insomnia and stress

    In counselling and psychotherapy sessions, the work involves talking with a therapist and exploring with the many different aspects of a person's life experiences. This helps them to understand themselves more deeply, including what has shaped them - why they think, feel and behave in certain ways. It also helps people to learn new, healthier ways to cope with life's stresses, such as hurt, disappointment, conflict, and loss,

    Our therapists come from a variety of backgrounds and trainings, and so have approaches that vary a little, but they will all work, broadly, in a similar way, which is welcoming, professional, supportive, containing and respectful.

    Therapy/counselling sessions normally take place at the same time and place on a weekly basis and last 50 minutes. At the first session, you will discuss what you want to focus on and will have an opportunity to ask the therapist how they work. You can decide together on a structure for the work or choose to take a route of more free exploration. Your therapist will support you in finding what works best for you.

    Details about the various approaches and techniques practised by the Kensington practitioners can be found in their individual profiles. There is no right or wrong to have therapy, so take a look and choose a therapist whose working method seems to chime with you. Whatever approach the practitioner adheres to, they will give you their full attention during sessions and commit to providing a warm, safe and non-judgmental space for your exploration.

    Someone coming for counselling and psychotherapy in our West London practice can expect a confidential, respectful environment in which they will be supported by a skilled professional to speak about whatever they wish, and to express and explore their feelings, safely and productively, in a variety of ways.

    Practitioners offering face to face counselling or psychotherapy within safe 2 meters distance

    Click here to view Ashleen Neeson's profile

    Ashleen Neeson

    BACP Registered Counsellor & Psychotherapist

    Working on Tuesdays, Wednesdays
    Phone: 07901981050
    Email: Ashleen@clearmindlondon.co.uk

    Emily Cavendish

    UKCP Accredited Psychotherapist

    Working on Mondays, Tuesdays, Fridays
    Phone: 07766140325
    Email: info@emilycavendish.com

    Click here to view Emma Myrtle's profile

    Emma Myrtle

    BACP Registered Counsellor & Psychotherapist

    Working on Tuesdays, Wednesdays
    Phone: 07562228022
    Email: emma@emmamyrtletherapy.com

    Click here to view Melanie Plant's profile

    Melanie Plant

    BACP Registered Counsellor & Psychotherapist

    Working on Wednesdays, Thursdays
    Phone: 07971647393
    Email: melanie@melanieplant.com

    Monica Mason Therapist

    Monica Mason

    BACP Accredited Counsellor & Psychotherapist

    Working on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays
    Phone: 0777 989 3399
    Email: monica@monicamason.com

    Click here to view Ondine Smulders' profile

    Ondine Smulders

    UKCP Accredited Psychotherapist

    Working on Mondays, Wednesdays
    Phone: 07456 918147
    Email: counselling17@hotmail.com

    Click here to view Simon Wilson Stephen's profile

    Simon Wilson Stephens

    BACP Registered Counsellor

    Working on Tuesdays, Thursdays
    Phone: 07977 241 365
    Email: simon@wilsonstephenstherapy.com

    Camille de Stempel

    BACP Registered Counsellor & Psychotherapist

    Working on Tuesdays
    Phone: 07801206199
    Email: cdestempel@aol.com

    Sian Morris, UKCP Accredited Psychotherapist

    Dr Sian Morris

    HCPC Counselling Psychologist

    Working on Wednesdays
    Phone: 07905819925
    Email: sianlouisemorris@hotmail.co.uk

    Robin Robinson

    BACP Registered Counsellor

    Working on Wednesdays
    Phone: 07983 248 558
    Email: robin@robinrobinson.co.uk

    Click here to see Adam Kincel's profile

    Dr Adam Kincel

    UKCP Accredited Psychotherapist

    Working on Wednesdays
    Phone: 07920255542
    Email: adam@gestalt.uk.com